The Technical Debt Community

So you’ve got Technical debt… now what? Ward Cunningham coined the metaphor back in 1992, and it has since been taken on by the industry to describe the consequences of poor software architecture and bad coding. This website encourages a pragmatic view of technical debt, attempting to elevate the discussion from merely defining technical debt to finding approaches for business technology organizations to use technical debt awareness as a vehicle to fix fundamental problems

Recent blogs posts

The Technical Debt Singularity

By Frances Lash | January 23, 2015

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A technology singularity, in terms laid out by this post on technical debt, is a point when technology created by humans reaches the point where it can no longer be understood by its creators. A mathematical singularity is a point beyond which odd or unpredictable behaviours can be recognized. In formulating the hypothesis for this ... read more

Is Refactoring “Needless Rework”? – Refactoring for Design Level Smells

By Frances Lash | January 19, 2015

Here’s a post that delves into the necessity of refactoring in software engineering, comparing the practicality of refactoring in software to restructuring in urban planning. It begins by stating that when running software projects that span millions of lines of code the original design is usually good, over a period of time, however, the design ... read more

Technical Debt is Risk Management

By Frances Lash | January 9, 2015

If refactoring code reduces a code base by 80%, then the chance of missing a necessary change in the code base and the risk of missing something in testing that damages the production business are also reduced. Therefore, by this logic, the management of technical debt is in fact risk management. Using the analogy of ... read more

The Three Kinds of Code: Divergent Perceptions about Cost

By Frances Lash | January 5, 2015

This post discusses the three categories of code that can be found within a certain project and that confusion about them plus a misunderstanding about their actual cost can lead to trouble. The three categories of code follow: Temporary Code: or code written to throw away within a day or week – if it breaks it’s ... read more

Not all Technical Debt should be Treated Equally

By Frances Lash | December 30, 2014

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The on going management of technical debt has become viewed as critical for the development of high quality and maintainable software, even by those who promote agile development processes. This consideration for tech debt management has contradicted the notion that development decisions should almost exclusively be driven by business value because of the difficulty of ... read more

Bad code isn’t Technical Debt, it’s an unhedged Call Option

By Frances Lash | December 29, 2014

This is a post that discusses an alternative to the metaphor of technical debt for ‘bad code’. The problem with technical debt as a metaphor is that for managers debt can be a good thing – it can required for financial needs or encouraged by tax breaks in certain financial situations. However, the debt that ... read more